Posts Tagged ‘apocalypse’

This is a guest submission from Alan on the use of radios for communication after an apocalyptic event.

One of the technologies that we take for granted is the interlaced global communications satellites. As a benefit of a massive government investment in the 1960s space race you now have the ability to have a cell phone, satellite television, and GPS to show you how to get from point A to point B. All good, but what happens if those satellites no longer function?

Massive solar storms have the potential to damage satellites to burned out hulks of mechanical and electrical components. Should we be the target of an invasion from outer space, the first order of business would be to take out our “eyes”. In the case of zombies you would probably be too busy avoiding having your brains eaten.

How would you communicate in the event of an apocalyptic event? Are there means at your disposal to coordinate with fellow survivors? The answer to that is yes.

Garmin walkie talkie with GPS

One of the items that readily available is the simple walkie talkie. Many electronics stores sell these in a wide variety of styles and ease of use. Many outdoors stores sell these even with GPS built in…for a price. There are several services that fall under this category that require no license to those that do require them. The problem with these is that they often are of very low power and only have the capabilities to communicate short distances. They are also fixed on channelized frequencies that require some skill to modify (which is a violation of FCC rules). They also require a charger to convert 120volts AC to the appropiate voltage DC to operate. Some models only require a couple of batteries and an even greater sacrifice of power. If the function is for survival I would probably avoid this method.

Cobra CB Radio

Another option is the traditional CB radio. These come in a variety of quality. The advantage of CB is that they operate in the 11 meter band which is down in the upper end of what is called the High Frequency range. They are capable of skipping some distance but it is generally unreliable as a general rule. These are generally mobile and can even be operated as a base station with power from a simple car battery. One downfall is that these radios also have channelized frequencies. While you can modify these, it is once again against FCC rules unless you are doing so to work them into the 10meter Ham band and have an FCC license. This is not the most efficient use however.

The next form of communication is to go ahead and get a Ham license. The entry level is the Technician Class and can be obtained relatively easy. This license allows radio priveledges in the VHF (Very High Frequencies) UHF (Ultra High Frequencies) and SHF (Super High Frequencies or more commonly the microwave bands). Many use walkie talkie type units the operate in the 2meter band although you can get them in multiple bands. I own one that allows 4 different tansmitting bands and has general receiving capabilities that include AM, FM, TV, Marine, Air, and commerical frequencies up to 900 MHZ with cell phone frequencies blocked. These bands are generally line of site with the use of repeaters placed in strategic places to retransmit the signal or repeat. The repeater splits the signal by receiving on one frequency and transmitting on another. Modern radios has these splits programmed in and allow modification if a local group chooses to do so. With repeaters here in the Portland metro area I have the capability with low power to talk to people in SW Washington, south to Salem and into the east county metro area. Because there are hills between me and Beaverton I can hear their signals but I cannot transmit into the repeater from my location. The radios are also capable of point to point single frequency transmit and receive but again, you must be in the “line of sight”. Certainly usable in emergencies. A test of simple basic electronics, a simple understanding of radio theory, safety, and FCC rules and at one time $12 would net you a Technician Class FCC license.

With Ham radios, you can start small and work your way up.

If you are really looking for long distance and fairly reliable communication the recommended the next step up and test for the General Class license. This license allows numerous radio frequencies along with those of the Technician Class. The plus factor is access to High Frequency bands with much higher power that allows worldwide communication without the use of repeaters or satellites. There are commercially available radios that can operate off a simple car battery with excellent results. This license can be obtained by knowing and understanding more advanced electronics, and radio theory. Communication can even include teletype, slow scan television (within allowed frequencies), and even digital data modes. Far more bang for your buck.

While the notion that learning electronics and radio theory seems daunting, it is accessable to anyone. The national organization that represents the Amateur Radio hobby is the Amateur Radio Relay League (ARRL) in Connecticut. They have available for purchase study guides with test questions. Test questions come from a predetermined pool. Each individual test will include several questions from each section of the pool. Morse code is no longer required, but can be learned after obtaining a license and there are study materials even for that. Morse code is handy during periods of high noise or low power and allow a signal to penetrate through the muck when other modes just won’t get the job done.

The bottom line is that there is not need to fear communicating in the event of apocalypse. A little preperation beforehand will yeald satisfactory reults. You can even build gear out of old parts. In high school we wound coils of wire around toilet paper rolls to build transmitters on a piece of wood.

– Alan

Alan is a Vietnam veteran with a Technician Class license working on his General license whose father was a Navy radioman and toyed with electronics and radios his whole life. Alan is also Tim’s dad, but don’t hold that against him.

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So many gun choices, so little time. Make sure you think logically about your gun purchases.

Welcome back Survivors,

We all realize that we need weapons for the ZPoc. Even the most hardcore melee expert among us must recognize that a distance fight with overwhelming numbers is a better option than muscle fatigue before death. Therefore we use the most advanced tool allotted to us: the firearm. No history lesson, no uppity garbage. Straight to business.

We need to be very prudent with our selections. Unless you have money to literally burn then you’re like me. So cost is an object. We’re going to look at economical and versatile weapons that will fit our needs.

Ruger 10/22
Up first is the Ruger 10/22. This rifle is affordable and has almost as many aftermarket parts as the 90’s Honda Civics! If you don’t like the standard rifle configuration you can buy an Archangel conversion kit (complete with bayonet). A .22 caliber rifle is so versatile it would take days to list all its attributes, but for us it means we have a ton of lightweight ammo for a weapon that is lightweight and reliable. The most attractive aspect of this rifle is its price. You can pick up a Ruger 10/22 for around $200.

The Ruger 10/22 carbine. Quite possibly one of the greatest guns ever built.

 

 

 

A good way for you to contribute to ZAI is give us a good range report on it, its weight, its capacity to weight ratio, and its accuracy! You don’t have to be a prize winner to contribute. Just be honest!

The Conversion kit
Many of us have AR style rifles. Quick note: AR does not stand for Assault Rifle. It stands for Armalite Rifle. Assault rifles fire multiple bullets with a single squeeze of the trigger. Don’t be drawn into that tired argument.

The .22 conversion for the AR rifle is a drop-in bolt and a magazine designed for the .22 long rifle shells. I recommend the CMMG conversion kit for price, but I will not recommend their magazines. Buy Blackdog magazines for your conversion.

This lightweight kit adds an additional tool to your arsenal. The ability to swap over to the .22 on the fly will give you more capabilities and an abundance of ammo for little weight. It also utilizes your primary weapon so there is no adjustment to reloading, sights, or fundamental manipulations. Excellent for training on a budget as well. I highly recommend it!

The Kel Tec Sub 2000 series
Pistol carbines are a great idea. Accuracy and precision chamber for your secondary weapon. They also make them in a lot of popular magazine patterns and calibers. Being able to have the same ammo for both your pistol and your carbine is outstanding for close in urban work. It also saves on weight because you use the same magazines as your pistol.

One consideration for a Zpoc gun is one that uses the same caliber and magazines as your sidearm.

The rifle conveniently folds for transpiration and storage, which is critical if you need to move quickly. Ideally, weapons of this nature show their versatility simply by being themselves. They give the user a lot of options for an excellent price.

These are just a few things for you to consider when buying your weapons. More soon.

I’m Zom TAC and this is something for you to consider.
Stay alert, stay alive.

 

Ed. Note; A while back we posted an article about buying a gun. Zom TAC has taken this a bit further and added some other considerations. Tell us what you think in the comments! -Eric ZAI.

Greetings faithful followers.

Last weekend, Zombie Awareness International combined forces with several other like minded and awesome individuals and groups, to form Z.O.P.E.C.

The coalition consists of the awesome folks over at “Don’t Get Bit” both on WordPress and Facebook, Zombie Hunters Inc., and Zombie Safe Area.

This coalition will be beneficial to all of our members not only to provide backup when Zpoc happens, but also to cross post and share information with all of our members more easily.

Jason over at Don’t Get Bit worked up a logo for us, and has promised to do a weekly ad for the coalition. Can’t wait. In the meantime, go check out all of our pages and “like” them.

Semper Vigilans, Semper Paratus -Eric

Z.O.P.E.C. Logo

Z.O.P.E.C. weekly ad

Greetings loyal fans and followers. We decided that we have finally grown large enough on facebook that we should expand onto an actual website to give us more freedom of movement. We will still maintain the same level of content on facebook, but will also use this site to expand our program, with continued commitment to you, our readers, with quality content that is informative, entertaining, educational and downright awesome. So, keep reading, keep your eyes open and please comment and get involved in this community as much as you have on the facebook page. Semper Vigilans Semper Paratus! -Eric