Archive for the ‘Tip of the Day’ Category

New research published by Dermato-Endocrinology shows that the risk of hospital-acquired infections could be significantly reduced by increasing vitamin D concentrations among hospital patients. My first thought was that if it were possible to have a cure or treatment for the zombie virus that having a healthy dose of vitamin D might help prevent infections. I know what you’re thinking: “But Tim, there is no cure for the zombie virus except a bullet to the head or other means of destroying the brain.” There has been speculation about rabies being a possible cause of the zombie outbreak due to lack of vaccinations or mutation for humans. With the proper innoculations, could this viral infection of the brain be even better prevented with more vitamin D?

When thinking about antibiotic bacterias already becoming more prevalent, what this study seems to point to is what each of us can do in the event we are exposed to these infections. According to the researchers, vitamin D strengthens the immune response by overcoming the antibiotic resistance of many bacteria encountered in hospitals. Vitamin D doses are given to these patients to help them fight off diseases that are contracted in hospitals, but I wonder if this could be extrapolated to work not just for hospital infections. There are multiple reasons why people are vitamin D deficient. What can you do to boost your immune system as well as fight off other diseases?

Eat meat. Most natural sources of vitamin D are animal-based, including cheese, egg yolks, fish and fish oils, milk, and beef liver. Vegetarians are more at risk for vitamin D deficiency.

Get some sun. The body makes vitamin D when your skin is exposed to sunlight. Sunblock lotions can prevent synthesis of vitamin D, but make sure you wear a proper sunblock to help prevent sunburn, which can lead to skin cancer. Darker skin is also known to reduce the skin’s ability to create vitamin D.

Exercise and lose weight. Vitamin D is extracted from the blood by fat cells, altering its release into the circulation. People with a body mass index of 30 or greater often have low blood levels of vitamin D.

What I am saying is that a lifestyle of inactivity and lack of exposure to the sun will not only lead to obesity, and with it other health problems, but it could also contribute to you being more likely to contract the zombie virus. So stock up on food and ammo, prepare your bug out bags, but step away from the computer and get some fresh air. Go for a walk and get some exercise and you might just save your life in ways you never expected. Dissenting comments will only prove my point for more than the reasons that I have stated and should be the first to step away from the computer.

– Tim

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Our YouTube page was looking a little sparse, so Tim decided to show you yet another way to get a fire going using some simple household items. You can then go back and watch our previous video sharing a few ways to get cooking quickly.



Brought to you by Kershaw & Zero Tolerance Knives.

Survival Tip of the Day brought to you by Kershaw.

In a survival situation you must be prepared for an injury or medical problem. You might suffer a minor cut or scrape, but without proper treatment that cut could become a much bigger problem. Store bought first aid kits are available, but here are some essential items to help you assemble your own custom basic first aid kit.

  • Adhesive Bandages: Use these to keep small cuts and blisters covered and clean. Infection is the enemy, especially with zombie infection.
  • Bandages: These are useful for a variety of purposes, from keeping dressings in place and binding wounds closed to tying up broken limbs to prevent further damage.
  • Gauze Padding: Gauze pads absorb blood and keep wounds clean while they heal.
  • Safety Pins: Can be used to secure bandages and as temporary sutures.
  • Painkillers: Can help you get through difficult times. Should be saved for when you really need them most.
  • Scissors: A useful tool. You should buy a high-quality pair with a blunt nose if stored in a first aid kit. Can be substituted with a good knife. We recommend Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives.
  • Antiseptic: Antiseptic wipes are good for cleaning wounds, and cream will prevent infection and help heal minor wounds.
  • Corn Pads: You may laugh, but when it comes to blisters and other foot problems you’ll be thanking me.
  • Large Triangular Bandage: Can be used to make a sling, for supporting a broken arm, or as a bandage.

Thanks again to Kershaw. You can find Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives on Facebook.

– Tim

Survival Tip of the Day brought to you by Kershaw.

3 Reasons Why Your Shelter Is Crucial to Survival

A shelter can protect you from the sun, insects, wind, rain, snow, hot or cold temperatures and enemy observation. It can give you a feeling of well-being. It can help you maintain your will to survive.

In some areas, your need for shelter may take precedence over your need for food and possibly even your need for water. For example, prolonged exposure to cold can cause excessive fatigue and weakness (exhaustion). An exhausted person may develop a “passive” outlook, thereby losing the will to survive.

Size Matters

The most common error in making a shelter is to make it too large. A shelter must be large enough to protect you. It must also be small enough to contain your body heat, especially in cold climates.

Shelter Site Selection Tips

When you are in a survival situation and realize that shelter is a high priority, start looking for shelter as soon as possible. As you do so, remember what you will need at the site. It must contain material to make the type of shelter you need, and it must be large enough and level enough for you to lie down comfortably.

When you consider these requisites, however, you cannot ignore your tactical situation or your safety. You must also consider whether the site provides concealment from enemy observation. Are there camouflaged escape routes? Does your shelter have any method for signaling? You must be sure that any shelter is able to protect against wild animals and rocks and dead trees that might fall. It is also important that your structure is free from insects, reptiles and poisonous plants.

You must also remember the problems that could arise in your environment. There could be a heavy rain overnight, causing flooding in low-lying areas, so avoid possible flood zones in foothills. Avoid avalanche or rockslide areas in mountainous terrain, and be careful when camping along bodies of water. The water level could rise drastically with the tide, or from heavy rains upstream.

In some areas, the season of the year has a strong bearing on the site you select. Ideal sites for a shelter differ in winter and summer. During cold winter months you will want a site that will protect you from the cold and wind, but will have a source of fuel and water. During summer months in the same area you will want a source of water, but you will want the site to be almost insect free. When considering shelter site selection, use the word “BLISS” as a guide.

B – Blend in with the surroundings.

L – Low silhouette.

I – Irregular shape.

S – Small.

S – Secluded location.

Information courtesy of the U.S. Army Survival Manual

Thanks again to Kershaw for their support. Remember to like Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives on Facebook.

– Tim

Survival Tip of the Day brought to you by Kershaw.

L – Live by Your Wits, But for Now, Learn Basic Skills

Kershaw fire starter - a basic tool to save your life

Without training in basic skills for surviving and evading on the battlefield, your chances of living through a combat, survival and/or evasion situation are slight.

Learn these basic skills now — not when you are headed for or are in the battle, or en route for an excursion to a remote or harsh environment. How you decide to equip yourself before deployment will impact on whether or not you survive. You need to know about the environment to which you are going and you must practice basic skills geared to that environment. For instance, if you are going to a desert, you need to know how to get water in the desert.

Practice basic survival skills during all training programs and exercises. Survival training reduces fear of the unknown and gives you self-confidence. It teaches you to live by your wits.

Information courtesy of the U.S. Army Survival Manual

Thanks again to Kershaw. Use your wits and remember to like Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives on Facebook.

– Tim

Survival Tip of the Day brought to you by Kershaw.

A – Act Like the Natives

The natives and animals of a region have adapted to their environment. To get a feel of the area, watch how the people go about their daily routine. When and what do they eat? When, where and how do they get their food? When and where do they go for water? What time do they usually go to bed and get up? These actions are particularly important to you when you are trying to avoid capture.

Act Like the Natives, Follow the Animals

Animal life in the area can also give you clues on how to survive. Animals also require food, water and shelter. By watching them, you can find sources of water and food.

Animals cannot serve as an absolute guide to what you can eat and drink. Many animals eat plants that are toxic to humans.

Keep in mind that the reaction of animals can reveal your presence to the enemy. If in a friendly area, one way you can gain rapport with the natives is to show interest in their tools and how they get food and water. By studying the people, you learn to respect them; you often make valuable friends; and, most importantly, you learn how to adapt to their environment and increase your chances of survival.

Information courtesy of the U.S. Army Survival Manual

Thanks again to Kershaw. Remember to like Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives on Facebook. Everyone else is doing it.

– Tim

Survival Tip of the Day brought to you by Kershaw.

V – Value Living

All of us were born kicking and fighting to live but we have become used to the soft life. We have become creatures of comfort. We dislike inconveniences and discomforts. What happens when we are faced with a survival situation with its stresses, inconveniences and discomforts? This is when the will to live — placing a high value on living — is vital. The experience and knowledge you have gained through life and your training will have a bearing on your will to live. Stubbornness, a refusal to give in to problems and obstacles that face you, will give you the mental and physical strength to endure.

Information courtesy of the U.S. Army Survival Manual

Thanks again to Kershaw. Remember you can like Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives on Facebook. You’ll be glad you did.

– Tim

Survival Tip of the Day brought to you by Kershaw.

I – Improvise

In the United States, we have items available for all our needs. Many of these items are cheap to replace when damaged. Our easy come, easy go, easy-to-replace culture makes it unnecessary for us to improvise. This inexperience in improvisation can be an enemy in a survival situation. Learn to improvise. Take a tool designed for a specific purpose and see how many other uses you can make of it.

Learn to use natural objects around you for different needs. An example is using a rock for a hammer. No matter how complete a survival kit you have with you, it will run out or wear out after a while. Your imagination must take over when your kit wears out.

Information courtesy of the U.S. Army Survival Manual

Thanks again to Kershaw. Go like Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives on Facebook.

– Tim

Survival Tip of the Day brought to you by Kershaw.

V – Vanquish Fear and Panic

The greatest enemies in a combat, survival and/or evasion situation are fear and panic. If uncontrolled, they can destroy your ability to make an intelligent decision. They may cause you to react to your feelings and imagination rather than to your situation. They can drain your energy and thereby cause other negative emotions. Previous survival and evasion training and self-confidence will enable you to vanquish fear and panic.

Information courtesy of the U.S. Army Survival Manual

Thanks again to Kershaw. Go like Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives on Facebook. Don’t be afraid.

– Tim

Survival Tip of the Day brought to you by Kershaw.

R – Remember Where You Are

Spot your location on your map and relate it to the surrounding terrain. This is a basic principle that you must always follow. If there are other persons with you, make sure they also know their location. Always know who in your group, vehicle or aircraft has a map and compass. If that person is killed, you will have to get the map and compass from him. Pay close attention to where you are and to where you are going. Do not rely on others in the group to keep track of the route. Constantly orient yourself. Always try to determine, as a minimum, how your location relates to —

  • The location of enemy units and controlled areas.
  • The location of friendly units and controlled areas.
  • The location of local water sources (especially important in the desert).
  • Areas that will provide good cover and concealment.

This information will allow you to make intelligent decisions when you are in a survival and/or evasion situation.

Information courtesy of the U.S. Army Survival Manual.

Thanks again to Kershaw. Go like Kershaw and Zero Tolerance Knives on Facebook.

– Tim